November 24 Lightning Lunch – Archiving Black History and Culture

Our final lunch of the semester features Afrosonic scholar and Hip Hop archivist Mark Campbell (Arts, Culture, and Media), art and curation researcher Andrea Fatona (Art at OCAD), and performance studies, identity, and citizenship scholar Kristin Moriah (English Language and Literature at Queen’s University). Tamara Walker will serve as moderator.

The event will take place from 12pm to 1:30pm EST on November 24, 2020. The speakers will give short presentations on their work, followed by discussion.

Register here to attend!

Speaker Biographies:

Mark V. Campbell is a DJ, scholar and curator. His research explores the relationships between Afrosonic innovations and notions of the human. Dr. Campbell is a former Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the department of Fine Arts at the University of Regina and is currently the Principal Investigator in the SSHRC funded research project, Hip Hop Archives: The Poetics and Potentials of Knowledge Production. Mark has published widely with essays appearing in the Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Critical Studies in Improvisation, Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society and the CLR Journal of Caribbean Ideas. His co-edited collection, We Still Here: Hip Hop North of the 49th Parallel, is set to be launched fall 2020 by McGill-Queen’s Press.

Andrea Fatona is an independent curator and an associate professor at the Ontario College of Art and Design University. She is concerned with issues of equity within the sphere of the arts and the pedagogical possibilities of art works produced by ‘other’ Canadians in articulating broader perspectives of Canadian identities. Her broader interest is in the ways in which art, ‘culture’ and ‘education’ can be employed by to illuminate complex issues that pertain to social justice, citizenship, belonging, and nationhood. She is the recipient of awards from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and was the 2017/18 OCAD U-Massey Fellow. Fatona is a Canada Research Chair Tier 2 in Canadian Black Diasporic Cultural Production. She has published scholarly articles, catalogue essays, and book chapters in a range of publications.

Kristin Moriah is an Assistant Professor of English at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Her forthcoming monograph, Dark Stars of the Evening, examines late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African-American performance, including the circulation of performance within the black diaspora and its influence on the formation of national identity. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the Social Sciences and Research Council of Canada, the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, and the Harry Ransom Center.

Tamara J. Walker is an historian of race, gender, and slavery in Latin America. Her research has appeared in such publications as Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave StudiesSafundi: The Journal of South African and American StudiesGender & History, The Journal of Family History, and Souls. Her first book, Exquisite Slaves: Race, Clothing and Status in Colonial Lima, was published by Cambridge University Press and received the 2018 Harriet Tubman Prize. She is currently at work on a book and digital archiving project focused on black subjects in Latin-American visual culture.

 

Recording Available!

Thank you to everyone for such a wonderful discussion! If you were not able to attend the lunch, or if you would like to rewatch the talk, a Zoom recording is available here. Additionally, we have posted the resources that were shared during the discussion below.

 

Resources

Center for Black Digital Research, Penn State University

 

Projects:

The State of Blackness

The Colored Conventions Project

Record VR Experience, Part 1

Record VR Experience, Part 2

 

Further Reading:

Abigail De Kosnik, Rogue Archives

Kimberly Christen and Jane Anderson, Toward Slow Archives