CFP: Lightning Rounds

 

CFP: Lightning Rounds 

4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference 

University of Toronto 

21-22 October 2021 

 

Missed the deadline? Crunched for time? Never fear! You can still participate in the fourth annual DH conference with our just-in-time lightning rounds. In this format, presenters will offer a 7-8 minute snapshot of their digital research, followed by 30-40 minutes for discussion and networking. The lightning rounds will take place during two afternoon sessions on Friday, 22 October 2021 from 1:00-2:25pm and 2:30-3:55 EST. 

All full-time faculty members, librarians, staff, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students at the University of Toronto are welcome to apply. 

Please contact Dr. Jennifer Ross at dhn.admin@utoronto.ca with your name and the title of your talk by 20 September 2021

 

About the Conference: 

This year’s conference foregrounds critical digital humanities research and praxis. Critical DH is an intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making, analyzing, and using digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that places anti-racist, de/anti/postcolonial, feminist, and queer/trans/non-binary work at its core, and which understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research. 

 

The 4th Annual DH Conference builds on the work of the Digital Humanities Network (DHN), which hosted the first DHN conference in 2016. In this year’s conference, we ask DH researchers and practitioners to interrogate power and culture with/through the frameworks of humanistic inquiry and digital technology. At the same time, the conference aims to foster collaborations and critical scholarship across the tri-campus community by providing a platform for people to share ideas, discuss trends and network with colleagues from UofT. While our focus this year emphasizes critical DH, all DH researchers, practitioners, and the DH-curious are encouraged to submit and attend! 

 

*Please note that the University of Toronto is under censure from the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) for its decision to terminate the hiring of Dr. Valentina Azarova as the director of the Faculty of Law’s International Human Rights Program (IHRP). More details of the censure can be found here. The CDHI supports CAUT’s censure and calls on the University of Toronto administration to uphold standards of academic freedom. We are observing the censure by not inviting any external speakers to participate in this conference, which is designed to build research networks in digital humanities within the University of Toronto. 

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Graduate and Undergraduate Poster Presentations

 

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Call for Graduate and Undergraduate Poster Presentations:

4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference

 

University of Toronto 

21-22 October 2021 

 

Registered graduate and undergraduate students from any U of T campus, discipline, and year-level are invited to submit posters in the humanities or interpretative social sciences on topics that engage with digital technology, digital tools, digital cultures, or research production. Cash prizes will be awarded to the best graduate and best undergraduate posters.

To submit, please email dhn.admin@utoronto.ca with a 150 word abstract outlining the research to be presented in your poster by 20 September 2021. Also include the title of poster and your minor/major/specialist field. Posters will be presented from 4:00-5:00 EST on Friday, 22 October.

 

About the Conference

This year’s conference foregrounds critical digital humanities research and praxis. Critical DH is an intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making, analyzing, and using digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that places anti-racist, de/anti/postcolonial, feminist, and queer/trans/non-binary work at its core, and which understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research.

The 4th Annual DH Conference builds on the work of the Digital Humanities Network (DHN), which hosted the first DHN conference in 2016. In this year’s conference, we ask DH researchers and practitioners to interrogate power and culture with/through the frameworks of humanistic inquiry and digital technology. At the same time, the conference aims to foster collaborations and critical scholarship across the tri-campus community by providing a platform for people to share ideas, discuss trends, and network with colleagues from U of T. While our focus this year emphasizes critical DH, all DH researchers, practitioners, and the DH-curious are encouraged to submit and attend!

Registered graduate and undergraduate students from any U of T campus, discipline, and year-level are invited to submit posters in the humanities or interpretative social sciences on topics that engage with digital technology, digital tools, digital cultures, or research production.

 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • De/anti/postcolonial DH
  • Indigeneity, technology, and DH
  • Network and data sovereignty
  • DH and the Global South
  • Black DH
  • Asian diaspora studies
  • Critical ethnic studies
  • Feminist data practices
  • Queer/trans/non-binary DH
  • Technology, pleasure, and desire
  • Bias in algorithms, AI, or machine learning
  • Critical/alternative archiving and preservation
  • Born-digital research and archiving
  • Digital/data privacy and the right to be forgotten
  • Critical infrastructures (i.e., software/hardware, tools, people)
  • Migration and movement
  • DH and the global past
  • Deep mapping
  • Decolonizing mapping and spatial analysis
  • Remote sensing/scanning
  • AR/VR/XR
  • Critical app studies
  • Electronic literature
  • Multilingual DH
  • Critical surveillance studies
  • Radical digital pedagogy
  • Digital research ethics
  • Equitable community partnerships
  • Justice-oriented DH praxis
  • Accessible DH
  • Genealogies of the critical digital humanities

 

Benefits to Students

  • Win cash prizes!
  • Gain valuable presentation experience
  • Network with like-minded peers and professors from a variety of fields
  • Include your presentation on your CV and grad school/job applications

 

Helpful Poster Design Guides

UTM http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/posters

Gerstein: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/c.php?g=251602&p=1674771

 

*Please note that the University of Toronto is under censure from the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) for its decision to terminate the hiring of Dr. Valentina Azarova as the director of the Faculty of Law’s International Human Rights Program (IHRP). More details of the censure can be found here. The CDHI supports CAUT’s censure and calls on the University of Toronto administration to uphold standards of academic freedom. We are observing the censure by not inviting any external speakers to participate in this conference, which is designed to build research networks in digital humanities within the University of Toronto.

 

CFP: Graduate Paper Presentations

 

CFP: 4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference 

Graduate Paper Presentations 

University of Toronto 

21-22 October 2021 

 

 

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) at the University of Toronto cordially invites U of T submissions to our fourth annual DH Conference, to take place virtually on 21-22 October 2021.  

This year’s conference foregrounds critical digital humanities research and praxis. Critical DH is an intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making, analyzing, and using digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that places anti-racist, de/anti/postcolonial, feminist, and queer/trans/non-binary work at its core, and which understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research. 

The 4th Annual DH Conference builds on the work of the Digital Humanities Network (DHN), which hosted the first DHN conference in 2016. In this year’s conference, we ask DH researchers and practitioners to interrogate power and culture with/through the frameworks of humanistic inquiry and digital technology. At the same time, the conference aims to foster collaborations and critical scholarship across the tri-campus community by providing a platform for people to share ideas, discuss trends and network with colleagues from UofT. While our focus this year emphasizes critical DH, all DH researchers, practitioners, and the DH-curious are encouraged to submit and attend! 

In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the 4th Annual DH Conference will be held online and is open to all U of T graduate students. The conference organizing committee welcomes proposals for graduate conference papers to occur synchronously over Zoom on the afternoons of October 21 and 22. Presentations should span 10-15 minutes and will be organized into themed sessions. Papers will focus on research that utilizes or has been enabled by digital technologies.  

Potential topics include, but are not limited to: 

  • De/anti/postcolonial DH 
  • Indigeneity, technology, and DH 
  • Network and data sovereignty 
  • DH and the Global South 
  • Black DH 
  • Asian diaspora studies 
  • Critical ethnic studies 
  • Feminist data practices 
  • Queer/trans/non-binary DH 
  • Technology, pleasure, and desire 
  • Bias in algorithms, AI, or machine learning 
  • Critical/alternative archiving and preservation 
  • Born-digital research and archiving 
  • Digital/data privacy and the right to be forgotten 
  • Critical infrastructures (i.e., software/hardware, tools, people) 
  • Migration and movement 
  • DH and the global past 
  • Deep mapping 
  • Decolonizing mapping and spatial analysis 
  • Remote sensing/scanning 
  • AR/VR/XR 
  • Critical app studies 
  • Electonic literature 
  • Multilingual DH 
  • Critical surveillance studies 
  • Radical digital pedagogy 
  • Digital research ethics 
  • Equitable community partnerships 
  • Justice-oriented DH praxis 
  • Accessible DH 
  • Genealogies of the critical digital humanities 

 

All graduate students at the University of Toronto are welcome to apply. 

 

Please submit 150-word abstracts and a short biography to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca by 10 September 2021. We will notify successful applicants by 15 September 2021. 

 

*Please note that the University of Toronto is under censure from the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) for its decision to terminate the hiring of Dr. Valentina Azarova as the director of the Faculty of Law’s International Human Rights Program (IHRP). More details of the censure can be found here. The CDHI supports CAUT’s censure and calls on the University of Toronto administration to uphold standards of academic freedom. We are observing the censure by not inviting any external speakers to participate in this conference, which is designed to build research networks in digital humanities within the University of Toronto. 

Announcing the Inaugural Cohort of Critical Digital Humanities Graduate Student Fellows

The University of Toronto’s Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) welcomes its inaugural cohort of graduate student fellows! Eight Graduate Fellowships in Critical Digital Humanities have been awarded to an interdisciplinary cohort of University of Toronto PhD students representing a range of disciplines across the divisions, including UTSC, UTM, FAS, and Information. Though their research varies widely, each project aligns with the CDHI’s focus on forging a new paradigm of critical humanities scholarship emphasizing questions of power, social justice, and critical theory.

The fellows will form a community of practice and will contribute to the broader CDHI community by participating in events, such as the CDHI annual conference, Lightning Lunches, and praxis workshops.

 

Top row: Carina Emilia Guzmán, Yuxing (Yolanda) Zhang, Tracy O’Brien, and Andrew Kaufman. Bottom row: Tia Sager, Taylor Thornton, Mariam Karim, and Ian Turner.

 

Carina Emilia Guzmán is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Information and the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies collaborative program, studying with Prof. T.L. Cowan (UTSC; Faculty of Information) and Prof. Jasmine Rault (UTSC; Faculty of Information). Guzmán’s dissertation is developing a trans-feminist and queer (TFQ) framework, “stor(y)ing mi desmadre,” to explore the digital, media, and archival praxes of feminized queer communities in Latin America.

Mariam Karim is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Information and the collaborative program at the Women and Gender Studies Institute, supervised by Prof. Jasmine Rault (UTSC; Faculty of Information). Her project examines Arab women’s movement’s (1936–2020) information activism, exploring feminist continuities and media transformations in movement websites and social media.

Andrew Kaufman is working towards his PhD in Human Geography under the supervision of Prof. Alan Walks (UTM). His project, “Vulture Capitalism: The Making of Sovereign Debt Markets,” will produce a digital guide tracing the path of capital that is lent to low-and-middle-income nations through global capital markets.

Tracy O’Brien is a PhD candidate in the Department of English and the collaborative Book History & Print Culture program studying with Prof. Lynne Magnusson (FAS). Her dissertation, “A Corpus Study of Language Variation in Early Modern Women’s Writing,” examines linguistic structures women writers used between the mid-16th and late-17th centuries.

Tia Sager is a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History. Her dissertation, entitled “The Poetics and Politics of Space: A Religion Analysis of the Cretan Postpalatial Built Environment” and supervised by Prof. Carl Knappett (FAS), explores the built environments of Late Bronze Age Crete by means of 3D modelling.

Taylor Thornton is a doctoral candidate working with Prof. Max Friesen in the Department of Anthropology (FAS). In collaboration with the Pitquhirnikkut Ilihautiniq/Kitikmeot Heritage Society (PI/KHS) and Carleton University’s Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre, she is developing the “Inuinnait Archaeology Atlas,” a digital platform that will record the Inuinnait cultural landscape, braiding together traditional Inuinnait knowledge and archaeological data.

Ian Turner is working towards his PhD in the Department for the Study of Religion with Prof. Christoph Emmrich (UTM). His doctoral research looks at how the Newar community in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley has drawn on Indigenous traditions of Buddhism and Hinduism through recent decades. By converting self-published printed paperbacks and chapbooks into text-searchable digital files, he maps the literal terms that the authors use to critically reflect on cultural forms like religion and the home.

Yuxing (Yolanda) Zhang is a PhD candidate working with Prof. Tero Karppi (UTM) at the Faculty of Information. Her research combines multispecies ethnography and media and infrastructural studies to examine the politics of water-based, algorithmic agroecological technologies in Suzhou, China.

Congratulations again to our incoming fellows!

Congratulations to the Emerging Projects Fund Recipients!

Congratulations to the five winners of the inaugural 2021-2022 Emerging Projects Fund competition of the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative! These exciting, cutting-edge critical digital humanities projects, each of which has been awarded $4000, represent the diversity of DH research at UofT.

Dr. Bhavani Raman (UTSC, Historical and Cultural Studies) will lead a team planning an historical data project, Decolonizing Archives of Water, about urban water systems and land use in Chennai, India.

Dr. Cara Krmpotich (Faculty of Information) and her team will develop a public online interface and archive of Indigenous “cultural belongings” for the Great Lakes Research Alliance for the Study of Aboriginal Arts and Culture, an international and inter-cultural collective dedicated to the study of the histories, languages, and cultures of the Great Lakes.

Dr. Patrick Keilty (Faculty of Information) is developing a protocol to create an online archive for the Sexual Representation Collection with potential applications across several fields.

Dr. Antje Budde (Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies) and Dr. Jill Carter will develop a livestream performance called Streaming Life: Storying the 94!, which will consist of a series of site-specific performative interventions provoked by the 94 Calls to Action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Canada.

Dr. Laurie Bertram (Department of History) and collaborators will build a digital exhibition and map titled Infamous: Brothels of Old Toronto, 1847-1917, which includes an ArcGIS map of 100 historical brothel locations in old Toronto and timely data on race, gender, and police corruption in sex work history.

The CDHI has been funded by the University of Toronto’s Institutional Strategic Initiatives program. We are pleased to support these faculty-led projects as part of its mandate to position UofT as a global leader in bringing questions of power and inequality to digital humanities research.

Farewell to Jennifer Ross!

Please join us in wishing our wonderful JHI Postdoctoral Fellow, Jennifer Ross, a fond farewell! Jennifer recently completed her postdoctoral fellowship with the Digital Humanities Network. Over the past year Jennifer was the organizer of the 2020–2021 Lightening Lunches, which brought together people from around campus and the world to discuss important and topical DH issues, such as indigenous data studiesarchiving black history and culture, and the intersection of DH and energy humanities

Jennifer also spent the fellowship continuing her research, which focused on American literature, critical disaster and terrorism studies, and critical digital humanities. After plenty of Covid delays, her contributions in one edited volume have finally been released, with a second volume on its way. The chapter “Tactics of Battle, Strategies of State: Counterterrorism and the Hurricane Katrina Exception” can be found in Liberal Disorder: Emergency Politics, Populist Uprisings, and Digital Dictatorships (Routledge, 2020). Later this year, her essay “A Language of Suffering and Solidarity: Building Transnational Community in Omar el Akkad’s American War” will be published in the edited volume Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples (Vernon Press, 2021). 

Thankfully, Jennifer isn’t going far: she has been awarded another postdoctoral fellowship with UTM’s Failure: Learning in Progress Project. In her new position, Jennifer works with Drs. Fiona Rawle and Nicole Laliberte to study the workings of power and privilege in failure pedagogy. We congratulate her on her new postdoctoral fellowship and look forward to seeing her at DH events around the tri-campus!   

Welcome to Elisa Tersigni!

The DHN is pleased to welcome Dr. Elisa Tersigni as the 2021-2022 JHI Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow! Elisa (Ph.D. University of Toronto, 2018) completed her doctorate in English and the collaborative program in Book History and Print Culture. After graduation, she held the position of Digital Research Fellow for the Mellon-funded research project, Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures at the Folger Shakespeare Library and a Digital Research Fellowship at the John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester. She has extensive experience working in both digital humanities projects and with special collections, having completed an M.Sc. in Material Cultures and History of the Book at the University of Edinburgh, and has received grants to pursue research at dozens of libraries across Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Her interests in digital humanities research extend across GIS mapping, textual analysis, transcription, and cataloguing of early manuscripts, and she is currently developing a new authorship attribution method that combines text analysis with GIS.

CFP: Graduate and Undergraduate Poster Presentations

Call for Graduate and Undergraduate Poster Presentations:

4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference

 

University of Toronto 

21-22 October 2021 

 

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) at the University of Toronto cordially invites U of T submissions to our fourth annual DH Conference, to take place virtually on 21-22 October 2021.

This year’s conference foregrounds critical digital humanities research and praxis. Critical DH is an intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making, analyzing, and using digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that places anti-racist, de/anti/postcolonial, feminist, and queer/trans/non-binary work at its core, and which understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research.

The 4th Annual DH Conference builds on the work of the Digital Humanities Network (DHN), which hosted the first DHN conference in 2016. In this year’s conference, we ask DH researchers and practitioners to interrogate power and culture with/through the frameworks of humanistic inquiry and digital technology. At the same time, the conference aims to foster collaborations and critical scholarship across the tri-campus community by providing a platform for people to share ideas, discuss trends, and network with colleagues from U of T. While our focus this year emphasizes critical DH, all DH researchers, practitioners, and the DH-curious are encouraged to submit and attend!

Registered graduate and undergraduate students from any U of T campus, discipline, and year-level are invited to submit posters in the humanities or interpretative social sciences on topics that engage with digital technology, digital tools, digital cultures, or research production.

 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • De/anti/postcolonial DH
  • Indigeneity, technology, and DH
  • Network and data sovereignty
  • DH and the Global South
  • Black DH
  • Asian diaspora studies
  • Critical ethnic studies
  • Feminist data practices
  • Queer/trans/non-binary DH
  • Technology, pleasure, and desire
  • Bias in algorithms, AI, or machine learning
  • Critical/alternative archiving and preservation
  • Born-digital research and archiving
  • Digital/data privacy and the right to be forgotten
  • Critical infrastructures (i.e., software/hardware, tools, people)
  • Migration and movement
  • DH and the global past
  • Deep mapping
  • Decolonizing mapping and spatial analysis
  • Remote sensing/scanning
  • AR/VR/XR
  • Critical app studies
  • Electronic literature
  • Multilingual DH
  • Critical surveillance studies
  • Radical digital pedagogy
  • Digital research ethics
  • Equitable community partnerships
  • Justice-oriented DH praxis
  • Accessible DH
  • Genealogies of the critical digital humanities

Benefits to Students

  • Win cash prizes!
  • Gain valuable presentation experience
  • Network with like-minded peers and professors from a variety of fields
  • Include your presentation on your CV and grad school/job applications

 

How to Submit

Please email dhn.admin@utoronto.ca with a 150 word abstract outlining the research to be

presented in your poster by 31 August 2021. Also include the title of poster and your

minor/major/specialist field. Posters will be presented from 4:00-5:00 EST on Friday, 22 October. It is your responsibility to be available to speak about your research during this time. We will notify successful students by 15 September 2021 and provide printing information at that time.

 

Helpful Poster Design Guides

UTM http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/posters

Gerstein: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/c.php?g=251602&p=1674771

 

*Please note that the University of Toronto is under censure from the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) for its decision to terminate the hiring of Dr. Valentina Azarova as the director of the Faculty of Law’s International Human Rights Program (IHRP). More details of the censure can be found here. The CDHI supports CAUT’s censure and calls on the University of Toronto administration to uphold standards of academic freedom. We are observing the censure by not inviting any external speakers to participate in this conference, which is designed to build research networks in digital humanities within the University of Toronto.

CFP: 4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference

 

CFP: 4th Annual Digital Humanities Conference

University of Toronto

21-22 October 2021

 

 

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) at the University of Toronto cordially invites U of T submissions to our fourth annual DH Conference, to take place virtually on 21-22 October 2021.

This year’s conference foregrounds critical digital humanities research and praxis. Critical DH is an intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making, analyzing, and using digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that places anti-racist, de/anti/postcolonial, feminist, and queer/trans/non-binary work at its core, and which understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research.

The 4th Annual DH Conference builds on the work of the Digital Humanities Network (DHN), which hosted the first DHN conference in 2016. In this year’s conference, we ask DH researchers and practitioners to interrogate power and culture with/through the frameworks of humanistic inquiry and digital technology. At the same time, the conference aims to foster collaborations and critical scholarship across the tri-campus community by providing a platform for people to share ideas, discuss trends and network with colleagues from UofT. While our focus this year emphasizes critical DH, all DH researchers, practitioners, and the DH-curious are encouraged to submit and attend!

In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the 4th Annual DH Conference will be held online and is open to U of T faculty, librarians, and staff. The conference organizing committee welcomes proposals in the following formats:

 

  • Conference Papers (Synchronous): 15-20 minute presentations to be organized into themed sessions. Papers will focus on research that utilizes or has been enabled by digital technologies. Paper sessions will be conducted live over Zoom.

 

  • Digital Exhibits / Project Demonstrations (Asynchronous): Exhibits/demonstrations will showcase digital sites, archives, visualizations, etc., with an emphasis on both design and research content. Digital exhibits/project demonstrations will be curated as asynchronous WordPress pages on the CDHI/DHN website with descriptions, screengrabs, links, etc. in order to allow viewers to explore the project asynchronously and leave comments and questions. Project designers will be expected to respond periodically to the comments/questions over the course of the conference.

 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • De/anti/postcolonial DH
  • Indigeneity, technology, and DH
  • Network and data sovereignty
  • DH and the Global South
  • Black DH
  • Asian diaspora studies
  • Critical ethnic studies
  • Feminist data practices
  • Queer/trans/non-binary DH
  • Technology, pleasure, and desire
  • Bias in algorithms, AI, or machine learning
  • Critical/alternative archiving and preservation
  • Born-digital research and archiving
  • Digital/data privacy and the right to be forgotten
  • Critical infrastructures (i.e., software/hardware, tools, people)
  • Migration and movement
  • DH and the global past
  • Deep mapping
  • Decolonizing mapping and spatial analysis
  • Remote sensing/scanning
  • AR/VR/XR
  • Critical app studies
  • Electonic literature
  • Multilingual DH
  • Critical surveillance studies
  • Radical digital pedagogy
  • Digital research ethics
  • Equitable community partnerships
  • Justice-oriented DH praxis
  • Accessible DH
  • Genealogies of the critical digital humanities

 

All full-time faculty members, librarians, and postdoctoral fellows at the University of Toronto, including research stream, teaching stream, and CLTAs, are welcome to apply.

Please submit 250-word abstracts and a 150-word biography to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca by 31 August 2021. We will notify successful applicants by 15 September 2021.

 

*Please note that the University of Toronto is under censure from the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) for its decision to terminate the hiring of Dr. Valentina Azarova as the director of the Faculty of Law’s International Human Rights Program (IHRP). More details of the censure can be found here. The CDHI supports CAUT’s censure and calls on the University of Toronto administration to uphold standards of academic freedom. We are observing the censure by not inviting any external speakers to participate in this conference, which is designed to build research networks in digital humanities within the University of Toronto.

 

Call for Funding: Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities

Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities

(deadline 28 June, 2021)

The Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities supports a small interdisciplinary cohort of University of Toronto Ph.D. candidates over the 2021-2022 academic year. Students will need to articulate their own project, which might involve engaging with digital humanities methods as the basis for a dissertation chapter or article; building a digital public humanities project or exhibit; or other DH research. For most applications, this project is likely to be part of the dissertation project.

Cohort Expectations
Fellows will form a community of practice and meet monthly between September and April. Over the course of the fellowship, each fellow will be expected to consult with relevant digital scholarship librarians whose expertise is aligned with the fellow’s research methods. Each fellow must commit to participating in two DH methods training workshops during the year and will present on their research at a late Spring 2022 event. Funded fellows must join the CDHI graduate student network and participate in CHDI activities including attending research symposia, roundtables, and visiting scholar talks.

Compensation
Fellows will receive a stipend of $10,000 for participating in the program and will be expected to dedicate approximately 300 hours for the fellowship between September and April.

Eligibility
University of Toronto graduate students who will have passed their comprehensive exams by 1 September 2021.

How to Apply
Please send the following to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca in one PDF file by the deadline:

  • a cover sheet
  • application cover sheet with a 250-word summary of the proposed project, written for a non-specialist audience, as well as the names and emails of two recommenders (see below). Applicants are also asked to fill out the CDHI membership form here.
  • research proposal outlining your critical digital humanities project (maximum 2 pages + up to one additional page for references and any other supporting documentation, if necessary.) The 2-page proposal should include a statement of the research, with research questions; situate the research in relevant critical DH literature; describe the project’s methodology; and discuss the project’s objectives and deliverables over the fellowship period, with a timeline. If you plan to work with specific digital scholarship librarians or other collaborators, please indicate.
  • CV

Deadline
Please submit your application, in one PDF file with the cover sheet, by the application deadline of June 28, 2021, 11:59 pm. Send your application to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca.

Evaluation
Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:
–Ability to clearly articulate the research questions, project goals, and methodology.
–Clear demonstration of the research significance.
–Project’s relationship to research that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies.

Adjudication
An interdisciplinary awards subcommittee, drawn from the CDHI Steering Committee, will be responsible for adjudicating applications. The CDHI Steering Committee is composed of community partners, faculty researchers, and digital scholarship librarians from each of the three campuses, the Faculty of Arts and Science, OISE, the Faculty of Information, and St. Michael’s University.

Reporting
Fellows will be expected to report on their fellowship by 1 April 2022. Recipients should anticipate submitting a brief report describing what was accomplished or what outcomes were achieved over the course of the fellowship.

Suggestions for Preparing Your Application
1) Situate your work in relationship to critical digital humanities. The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI), a University of Toronto strategic initiative, supports trans-disciplinary collaborations that emphasize questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in digital humanities research. Our vision is to forge a new paradigm of critical humanities scholarship, one that bridges the humanities’ emphasis on power and culture in historical perspective with the tools and analysis of digital technology. The CDHI is new mix of research workshop and design atelier, equipping humanities researchers with the technical and design expertise to use digital tools to ask new questions, share new knowledge, and analyze power and inequality in historical perspective.

2) Consider your project’s data. By data, we mean the primary sources of humanistic inquiry, such as images (photographs, artworks); archival material (personal papers, company records, ephemera); sound recordings; moving images; text (emails, social media, books, plays); tabular data (statistics, charts, census records); maps, and other primary sources. Does this data already exist? Will you be producing it as part of your project?

3) Consider your project’s research approach. To get a sense of the wide range of methodologies in Digital Humanities, skim the excellent Please skim the excellent “Topics in DH” page of the online Digital Humanities Literacy Guidebook (Weingard, Grunewald, & Lincoln, 2020). This resource provides a good sense of the wide variety of tools and methods that can be included under the very broad umbrella of “digital humanities.”

How to Reach Us
Please contact dhn.admin@utoronto.ca with any questions. To reach the Director, Elspeth Brown, please write: dhn.director@utoronto.ca. To subscribe to our bimonthly newsletter, please follow this link and complete our sign-up form. To join our list-serv, please write: dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. Follow us on Twitter at @UofTDHN. Explore our soon-to-be-replaced website at: https://dhn.utoronto.ca/.