Call for Funding: Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities

Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities

(deadline 28 June, 2021)

The Graduate Fellowship in Critical Digital Humanities supports a small interdisciplinary cohort of University of Toronto Ph.D. candidates over the 2021-2022 academic year. Students will need to articulate their own project, which might involve engaging with digital humanities methods as the basis for a dissertation chapter or article; building a digital public humanities project or exhibit; or other DH research. For most applications, this project is likely to be part of the dissertation project.

Cohort Expectations
Fellows will form a community of practice and meet monthly between September and April. Over the course of the fellowship, each fellow will be expected to consult with relevant digital scholarship librarians whose expertise is aligned with the fellow’s research methods. Each fellow must commit to participating in two DH methods training workshops during the year and will present on their research at a late Spring 2022 event. Funded fellows must join the CDHI graduate student network and participate in CHDI activities including attending research symposia, roundtables, and visiting scholar talks.

Compensation
Fellows will receive a stipend of $10,000 for participating in the program and will be expected to dedicate approximately 300 hours for the fellowship between September and April.

Eligibility
University of Toronto graduate students who will have passed their comprehensive exams by 1 September 2021.

How to Apply
Please send the following to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca in one PDF file by the deadline:

  • a cover sheet
  • application cover sheet with a 250-word summary of the proposed project, written for a non-specialist audience, as well as the names and emails of two recommenders (see below). Applicants are also asked to fill out the CDHI membership form here.
  • research proposal outlining your critical digital humanities project (maximum 2 pages + up to one additional page for references and any other supporting documentation, if necessary.) The 2-page proposal should include a statement of the research, with research questions; situate the research in relevant critical DH literature; describe the project’s methodology; and discuss the project’s objectives and deliverables over the fellowship period, with a timeline. If you plan to work with specific digital scholarship librarians or other collaborators, please indicate.
  • CV

Deadline
Please submit your application, in one PDF file with the cover sheet, by the application deadline of June 28, 2021, 11:59 pm. Send your application to dhn.admin@utoronto.ca.

Evaluation
Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:
–Ability to clearly articulate the research questions, project goals, and methodology.
–Clear demonstration of the research significance.
–Project’s relationship to research that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies.

Adjudication
An interdisciplinary awards subcommittee, drawn from the CDHI Steering Committee, will be responsible for adjudicating applications. The CDHI Steering Committee is composed of community partners, faculty researchers, and digital scholarship librarians from each of the three campuses, the Faculty of Arts and Science, OISE, the Faculty of Information, and St. Michael’s University.

Reporting
Fellows will be expected to report on their fellowship by 1 April 2022. Recipients should anticipate submitting a brief report describing what was accomplished or what outcomes were achieved over the course of the fellowship.

Suggestions for Preparing Your Application
1) Situate your work in relationship to critical digital humanities. The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI), a University of Toronto strategic initiative, supports trans-disciplinary collaborations that emphasize questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in digital humanities research. Our vision is to forge a new paradigm of critical humanities scholarship, one that bridges the humanities’ emphasis on power and culture in historical perspective with the tools and analysis of digital technology. The CDHI is new mix of research workshop and design atelier, equipping humanities researchers with the technical and design expertise to use digital tools to ask new questions, share new knowledge, and analyze power and inequality in historical perspective.

2) Consider your project’s data. By data, we mean the primary sources of humanistic inquiry, such as images (photographs, artworks); archival material (personal papers, company records, ephemera); sound recordings; moving images; text (emails, social media, books, plays); tabular data (statistics, charts, census records); maps, and other primary sources. Does this data already exist? Will you be producing it as part of your project?

3) Consider your project’s research approach. To get a sense of the wide range of methodologies in Digital Humanities, skim the excellent Please skim the excellent “Topics in DH” page of the online Digital Humanities Literacy Guidebook (Weingard, Grunewald, & Lincoln, 2020). This resource provides a good sense of the wide variety of tools and methods that can be included under the very broad umbrella of “digital humanities.”

How to Reach Us
Please contact dhn.admin@utoronto.ca with any questions. To reach the Director, Elspeth Brown, please write: dhn.director@utoronto.ca. To subscribe to our bimonthly newsletter, please follow this link and complete our sign-up form. To join our list-serv, please write: dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. Follow us on Twitter at @UofTDHN. Explore our soon-to-be-replaced website at: https://dhn.utoronto.ca/.

 

Call For Funding: Emerging Projects Fund

The Emerging Projects Fund 

in Critical Digital Humanities (deadline May 21, 2021) 

 

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) is a tri-campus research initiative that was funded by the University of Toronto’s Institutional Strategic Initiatives (ISI) Program in December 2020 for 3 years (Jan 2021-April 30, 2024). Building on the Digital Humanities Network (DHN) founded at the University of Toronto in 2016, the CDHI positions the University of Toronto as a global leader in bringing questions of power and inequality to digital humanities research. 

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative’s Emerging Project Fund offers funding for time-limited, faculty/librarian digital humanities project planning, international partnership networking, and/or tool-building through competitive seed grants. Each award of $4,000 is designed to support research in critical digital humanities. The Emerging Projects Fund particularly seeks to build research projects and teams that will be well positioned to apply for Tri-Council or other funding in the future. 

While all DH scholars are encouraged to apply, we will prioritize research projects engaged in critical digital humanities: research that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies. We also encourage applications for critical digital humanities projects that foreground creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research. 

 

 Eligibility 

All full-time faculty members and librarians at the University of Toronto, including research stream, teaching stream, and CLTAs. In the case of multi-university teams or community partnerships, the lead applicant must be a U of T faculty member.

 

 Funds Awarded 
Applications will be considered for budgets up to $4,000.

 

 Application Requirements 

Using language appropriate to a multi-disciplinary audience, please include the following information about the proposed project: 

  • A cover sheet
  • 1-2 page project description that addresses the following:
    • An explanation of the project, with research questions.
    • A description of the methodological approach (please contextualize in relationship to any work you have already undertaken in digital humanities).
    • A statement on how the project addresses CDHI goals of research that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies. If applicable, discuss how your work foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research.
    • A brief description of the team (if applicable).
  • A short budget with a justification for spending.
  • A bibliography (optional)

Applications should be submitted as a single PDF using standard font and spacing (single spacing is fine). Please email to: dhn.admin@utoronto.ca by the deadline of 11:59 pm on 21 May 2021. 

 If you have questions, please contact us at dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. If you would like some pointers about who to connect to regarding finding the expertise you need to get your project of the ground, please contact Dr. Elizabeth Parke, Senior Research Associate in Humanities and Social Sciences (based at UTM, but with a tri-campus mandate for this work) at elizabeth.parke@utoronto.ca. 

 

 Evaluation 

Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria: 

  • Ability to clearly articulate the research questions, project goals, and methodology. 
  • Clear demonstration of the project’s significance.
  • Project is in its early stages, rather than already well-supported with research funds.
  • Project’s relationship to research that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies.

 

Adjudication 

An interdisciplinary subcommittee drawn from the CDHI Steering Committee will be responsible for adjudicating applications. The CDHI Steering Committee is composed of community partners, faculty researchers, and digital scholarship librarians from each of the three campuses, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the Faculty of Information. Adjudication will take place at the end of May, with funds being dispersed by June 15, 2021.

 

Reporting 

Awardees will be expected to report on use of the seed funding by 1 April 2022. Recipients should anticipate submitting a brief report describing what was accomplished or what outcomes were achieved with the funds.  

 

How to Reach Us 
To contact the Director, Elspeth Brown, please write: dhn.director@utoronto.ca. To reach the team, please write: dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. To subscribe to the DHN’s biweekly newsletter, please follow this link and complete our sign-up form. To join our list-serv, please write: dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. Follow us on Twitter at @UofTDHN. Explore our soon-to-be-replaced website at: https://dhn.utoronto.ca/. 

 

March 30 Lightning Lunch – EH/DH: Energy Humanities and the Digital Turn

Join the DHN as we conclude our winter 2021 Lightning Lunch series! With a focus on the intersection of energy and digital humanities, this lunch will explore how energy humanists have integrated the study of new media and digital technologies into analysis of infrastructure and the environment. We are delighted to host Anne Pasek (Trent University), Caleb Wellum (University of Waterloo), and Lisa Parks (University of California at Santa Barbara) for an engaging discussion on energy, culture, and communication in the digital era. The lunch will be moderated by Imre Szeman (University of Waterloo).

The event will take place from 12:00pm to 1:00pm EST March 30, 2021. Speakers will give short presentations on their work, followed by discussion.

Register here to attend!

Speaker Biographies:

Anne Pasek is an interdisciplinary researcher working at the intersections of climate communication, the environmental humanities, and science and technology studies. She studies how carbon becomes communicable in different communities and media forms, to different political and material effects. Dr. Pasek is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cultural Studies and the School of the Environment at Trent University, as well as the Canada Research Chair in Media, Culture and the Environment.

Caleb Wellum is a Research Associate at the University of Waterloo, Canada. He writes and teaches about modern history, politics, and culture. Dr. Wellum also serves as the Research Manager of the Petrocultures Research Group. As a member of that group, he contributed to the collectively authored book After Oil and a recent project on the possibility of a solar future. He is now working on a book about the 1970s energy crisis in the United States. Wellum has published on the history of energy conservation, oil futures, car films, and the future of the humanities, among other topics.

Lisa Parks is Distinguished Professor of Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. She is a media scholar whose research focuses on multiple areas: satellite technologies and media globalization; critical studies of media infrastructures; media, militarization and surveillance; and environmental media. Parks is the author of Rethinking Media Coverage: Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror(Routledge, 2018) and Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual(Duke U Press, 2005). She is co-editor of Life in the Age of Drone Warfare(Duke U Press, 2017), Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures (U of Illinois Press, 2015), Down to Earth: Satellite Technologies, Industries and Cultures (Rutgers U Press, 2012), Undead TV (Duke UP, 2007), and Planet TV: A Global Television Reader(NYU Press, 2002). She is currently working on two new books, On Media: Twenty-one Lessons for the Twenty-first Century, and the co-edited volume, Media Backends: The Politics of Infrastructure, Clouds, and Artificial Intelligence.

Parks is Director of UCSB’s Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab, which she initiated at MIT. Parks is a 2018 MacArthur Fellow and has held other fellowships and visiting appointments at the International Research Center for Cultural Techniques & Media Philosophy (IKKM) at the Bauhaus University in Weimar, Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin, McGill University, University of Southern California, and the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been a Principal Investigator on major grants from the National Science Foundation and the US State Department, and has collaborated with artists and computer scientists. She is committed to exploring how greater understanding of media systems can inform and assist citizens, scholars and policymakers in the US and abroad to advance campaigns for technological literacy, creative expression, social justice, and human rights. Before returning to UCSB, Parks was Professor of Comparative Media Studies and Science, Technology, and Society at MIT.

Imre Szeman is University Research Chair and Professor of Communication Arts at the University of Waterloo, where he has worked since 2017. He previously held positions at McMaster University (1999-2009) and the University of Alberta (2009-2016). Szeman is the co-founder of the Petrocultures Research Group and one of the founders of the energy humanities, a new area of research crucial to addressing climate change.

Szeman’s main areas of research are in energy and environmental studies, social and political philosophy, and critical theory and cultural studies. From 1999-2009, he taught at McMaster University, and from 2009 to 2016 he worked the University of Alberta. Szeman is the recipient of the John Polanyi Prize in Literature (2000), the Petro-Canada Young Innovator Award (2003), the Scotiabank-AUCC Award for Excellence in Internationalization (2004), an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship (2005-7), the President’s Award for Excellence in Graduate Supervision at McMaster (2008), and a Killam Research Professorship (2013). In 2015, he was awarded the J. Gordin Kaplan Award for Excellence in Research, the U of Alberta’s most prestigious award recognizing research excellence in humanities, social sciences, law, education and fine arts. In 2020, he will be the Leverhulme Visiting Professor in Critical Studies at the University of Glasgow.

 

Recording Available!

Thank you to everyone for such a wonderful discussion! If you were not able to attend the lunch, or if you would like to rewatch the talk, a Zoom recording is available here. Additionally, we have posted the resources that were shared during the discussion below.

 

Resources

Projects:

Energy and Place

Energy Humanities

Solar Protocol

 

Further Reading:

Anne Pasek, Low-Carbon Research: Building a Greener and More Inclusive Academy

 

 

Call for Applications – Postdoctoral Fellowship with the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative, University of Toronto (deadline: Feb 19)

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI), in concert with the University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies Provost Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, is pleased to invite applications for a two year, fixed term postdoctoral fellowship beginning no later than December 31, 2021. The successful applicant will be supervised by CDHI Director Elspeth Brown. Applicants should propose research related to digital humanities from a critical, intersectional perspective. 

 

The CDHI is a tri-campus research initiative that bridges the humanities’ emphasis on power and culture with the tools and analysis of digital technology to forge a new, generative paradigm of digital humanities scholarship. Critical Digital Humanities is an emerging, intersectional field that emphasizes questions of power, social justice, and critical theory in making and analyzing digital technologies. This is a version of digital humanities that understands our current historic shift in digital technology as an opportunity for social and political transformation. Critical Digital Humanities foregrounds creative praxis, co-creation, public engagement, and community-based research.  

 

Purpose 

The University of Toronto Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship program provides funding to Graduate Faculties to increase opportunities for hiring postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented groups, specifically Indigenous and Black researchers. These fellowships will enable postdoctoral researchers to grow their scholarly profiles, undertake academic work at the University of Toronto, and strengthen the research environment at the University with diverse perspectives. Read about the Spring 2019, Fall 2019, and Fall 2020 recipients of the Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellows on the PPFP webpage. 

 

Eligibility 

The award is open to both domestic and international post-graduates. 

Nominees must: 

  • Demonstrate academic excellence and high potential for success in their chosen fields; 
  • Identify as Indigenous and/or Black; 
  • Have obtained a doctoral degree, at the time the fellowship commences and normally within the last five years from the start of the fellowship; and 
  • Not have held a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship previously. 

Recipients must: 

  • Begin the fellowship by December 31, 2021; 
  • Be a postdoctoral employee of the University of Toronto; 
  • Be associated with a supervisor appointed to a graduate unit; 
  • Register and remain registered with the Postdoctoral Office at SGS; 
  • Not hold concurrently another major fellowship; 
  • Not hold a faculty position or be on leave from such a position; 
  • Establish an IDP (Independent Development Plan), and submit to SGS within the first three months of the fellowship. The IDP should be reviewed annually and the revised copy sent to the Postdoctoral Office at SGS; and 
  • Submit proof of completion of degree no later than three months after the fellowship commences if they had not fulfilled all requirements for their degree at the time of nomination. 

 

At the University of Toronto, we strive to be an equitable and inclusive community, rich with diversity, protecting the human rights of all persons, and based upon understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of every person. We seek to ensure to the greatest extent possible that all students and employees enjoy the opportunity to participate as they see fit in the full range of activities that the University offers, and to achieve their full potential as members of the University community. 

 

Application Process: 

 

Applicants must submit the following: 

  • cover letter  
  • statement of research intent (maximum 2 pages) 
  • CV (no page limit) 
  • three letters of support 
  • a copy of completion of degree

 

All materials must be addressed and submitted to Professor Elspeth Brown, elspeth.brown@utoronto.ca no later than 5pm EST on February 19, 2021.

Welcome to Caleb Wellum!

The DHN is please to extend a warm welcome to Caleb Wellum. Caleb joins the team as the winter term Program Assistant on a part time, temporary basis to assist with DHN events and the drive to develop the infrastructure for the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative. Caleb received his PhD from the University of Toronto and currently serves as a Research Associate at the University of Waterloo. Caleb’s scholarship focuses on energy humanities and environmental history. He has contributed to the collectively authored book After Oil and a recent project on the possibility of a solar future. He is now working on a book about the 1970s energy crisis in the United States.

Farewell to Lawrence Evalyn!

Please join us in wishing our wonderful DHN Program Assistant, Lawrence Evalyn, a fond farewell! At the end of last semester, Lawrence completed his contract with the DHN. He now works to finalize his dissertation, “Print Politics in the Digital Archive, 1789-1799.” During his time with us, Lawrence proved to be an invaluable member of the team. He poured his heart into the ISI proposal, working countless hours on the formatting, appendices, and graphics, as well as supported the monthly Lightning Lunches by making event posters and monitoring Zoom attendance and chat. Lawrence also supervised our undergraduate communications assistant, Andy Huynh, coordinated DHN tasks in Asana, and took exceptional meeting minutes. Lawrence’s enthusiasm and diligence will be missed, but he hasn’t gone too far! In fact, he will be speaking next week at the Digital Literary Archives Lightning Lunch. We congratulate him on entering his final months of his PhD candidacy and wish him the very best!

DHN Winter Lightning Lunch Series, 2021

University of Toronto
Digital Humanities Network
Winter Lightning Lunch Series, 2021


 

Digital Literary Archives

Tuesday, 26 January, 2021

12:00pm – 1:30pm

 

Welcome to a new year and new semester! To start off our winter programing, join the DHN for the first Lightning Lunch on Digital Literary Archives. Claire Battershill (University of Toronto), Michelle Levy (Simon Fraser University), and Lawrence Evalyn (University of Toronto) gather to discuss the intersection of literature, print history, and digital archives. Jennifer Ross (University of Toronto) will serve as moderator.

 


 

Network Analysis

Tuesday, 23 February, 2021

12:00pm – 1:30pm

 

Our second lunch in the Winter 2021 Lightning Lunch series explores network analysis through art, religion, and the development of civilizations in the Mediterranean. Art historian Carl Knappett (University of Toronto), historian Irad Malkin (Tel Aviv University), and religious scholar John Kloppenborg (University of Toronto) describe their work excavating the development of trade, knowledge, and religious networks within and beyond the Greco-Roman world.

 


 

EH/DH: Energy Humanities and the Digital Turn

Tuesday, 30 March, 2021

12:00pm – 1:00pm

 

Join the DHN as we conclude our winter 2021 Lightning Lunch series! With a focus on the intersection of energy and digital humanities, this lunch will explore how energy humanists have integrated the study of new media and digital technologies into analysis of infrastructure and the environment. We are delighted to host Anne Pasek (Trent University), Caleb Wellum (University of Waterloo), and Lisa Parks (University of California at Santa Barbara) for an engaging discussion on energy, culture, and communication in the digital era.

The event will take place from 12:00pm to 1:00pm EST March 30, 2021. Speakers will give short presentations on their work, followed by discussion.

Announcing the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative!

We are pleased to announce that the Digital Humanities Network (DHN)’s proposal to launch a three year Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) has been funded! With nearly 3M of funding from the Institutional Strategic Initiatives and divisional contributions at the University of Toronto, the CDHI will bridge the humanities’ emphasis on power and culture with the tools and analysis of digital technology to forge a new, generative paradigm of critical humanities scholarship. With an emphasis on anti-racist, feminist, queer, and decolonial scholarship and research, the CDHI will gather together researchers, students, and collaborators from both the humanities and the data sciences to tackle some of the most pressing challenges of our time. The CDHI will position the University of Toronto as a global leader in bringing questions of power and inequality to digital humanities research, while continuing to support digital humanities work more broadly at the UofT.

The CDHI will provide support for critical digital humanities in multiple ways across the tricampus. Key objectives include building the research network through staffing in the form of a managing director, development officer, a knowledge mobilization officer, and two digital humanities developers; building a strong interdisciplinary research community through annual lightning lunch and speaker series; supporting new research through an emerging projects incubator, consultations, and training bursaries; mobilizing knowledge through public engagement and conferences; establishing a postdoctoral fellowship program; offering a suite of 96 undergraduate and graduate student critical DH fellowships; and creating a robust sustainability plan that will secure funding for digital humanities at UofT long-term.

The proposal emerged over a 15-month planning process in 2019-2020, which included two plenary strategic planning sessions and over 55 individual meetings with faculty researchers, Chairs, Deans, and VP Research across the tri-campus. The proposal is supported through divisional contributions from four divisions at the UofT: UTM, UTSC, the Faculty of Information, and the Faculty of Arts and Science. Over 100 faculty members and librarians have contributed to our planning process. A 10-person faculty working group spent the summer workshopping a draft proposal, enabling us to further clarify our vision and goals.

The CDHI proposal is the first humanities application to be funded by the ISI, as well as the first to feature a project lead from Mississauga (Dr. Elspeth Brown, Historical Studies). In the coming months, the DHN looks forward to enacting the infrastructure of this new initiative. If you would like to review a copy of the proposal in its final form, please contact the DHN admin at dhn.admin@utoronto.ca. 

February 23 Lightning Lunch – Network Analysis

Our second lunch in the Winter 2021 Lightning Lunch series explores network analysis through art, religion, and the development of civilizations in the Mediterranean. Art historian Carl Knappett (University of Toronto), historian Irad Malkin (Tel Aviv University), and religious scholar John Kloppenborg (University of Toronto) describe their work excavating the development of trade, knowledge, and religious networks within and beyond the Greco-Roman world.

The event will take place from 12:00pm to 1:00pm EST February 23, 2021. Speakers will give short presentations on their work, followed by discussion.

Register here to attend!

Speaker Biographies:

Carl Knappett specializes in the Aegean Bronze Age, and Minoan Crete in particular. His main focus currently is the east Cretan site of Palaikastro, where he directs a new excavation project. Professor Knappett continues his research on pottery from a number of other Aegean sites, such as Knossos, Malia, Myrtos Pyrgos, Akrotiri, and Miletus. This multi-sited approach has led him into various kinds of network analysis for investigating regional interactions. 

Irad Malkin recently published a book (soon in paperback) applying Network Theory to the question of how did Greek civilization emerge during the Archaic period when Greeks were actually distancing themselves from each other. How did civilizational convergence accompany settlement divergence? This follows his interest in religion and colonization, the use of myth as mediator between political communities and lands, ethnicity and collective identity, and Mediterranean history and historiography. In 1986 he co-founded and still serves as co-editor of the Mediterranean Historical Review.

John S. Kloppenborg is a specialist in Christian origins and second Temple Judaism, in particular the Jesus tradition (the canonical and non canonical gospels), and the social world of the early Jesus movement in Jewish Palestine and in the cities of the eastern Empire. He has written extensively on the Synoptic Sayings Gospel (Q) and the Synoptic Problem, and is currently writing on the parables of Jesus, the letter of James, and cultic, professional, and ethnic associations in the Graeco-Roman world. He is one of the general editors of the International Q Project and holds a five year SSHRC Insight Grant on Associative Practices in the Graeco-Roman World.

 

Recording Available!

Thank you to everyone for such a wonderful discussion! If you were not able to attend the lunch, or if you would like to rewatch the talk, a Zoom recording is available here.

 

 

January 26 Lightning Lunch – Digital Literary Archives

Welcome to a new year and new semester! To start off our winter programing, join the DHN for the first Lightning Lunch on Digital Literary Archives. Claire Battershill (University of Toronto), Michelle Levy (Simon Fraser University), and Lawrence Evalyn (University of Toronto) gather to discuss the intersection of literature, print history, and digital archives. Jennifer Ross (University of Toronto) will serve as moderator.

The event will take place from 12:00-1:00pm EST on January 26, 2021. Speakers will give short presentation on their work, followed by discussion.

Register here to attend!

Speaker Biographies:

Claire Battershill is an Assistant Professor cross-appointed in the Faculty of Information and the Department of English. Her research specializes in early twentieth-century literature and book and publishing history. She also writes short stories. Before returning to Toronto, she held a SSHRC postdoc at the University of Reading and a Banting Postdoc and SSHRC Impact Award at Simon Fraser University. She co-directs The Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP), funded by a SSHRC Insight Grant, and was the co-creator of Make Believe: The Secret Library of M. Prud’homme, an imaginative exhibition of literature and material arts, funded by a Canada Council New Chapter Award in 2019. 

Michelle Levy specializes in Romantic literary history, print and manuscript culture, and women’s book history. She is the co-editor of the Broadview Reader in Book History (with Tom Mole, 2014); the co-author of Broadview Introduction to Book History (with Tom Mole, 2017); and is a contributor to the Multigraph Collective’s Interacting with Print: Elements of Reading in the Era of Print Saturation (2018). She has published extensively on women writers, print and manuscript culture, and digital humanities. Her first book, Family Authorship and Romantic Print Culture (Palgrave, 2008), explores the conjunction of authorship and family life as a distinctive cultural formation of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Her new book, Literary Manuscript Culture in Romantic Britain, forthcoming in 2020 with Edinburgh University Press, describes how the practices of manuscript production and circulation interacted with an expanding print marketplace to nurture and transform the period’s literary culture. She also directs the Women’s Print History Project, 1750-1830, a comprehensive bibliographical database of women’s books.

Lawrence Evalyn is a PhD Candidate in English at the University of Toronto, examining digital research infrastructures and their impact on eighteenth century studies. His dissertation, “Print Politics in the Digital Archive, 1789-99,” investigates principles of inclusion and exclusion in eighteenth-century conceptions of literature and in contemporary digital databases.

Jennifer Ross is the Digital Humanities Network Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Jackman Humanities Institute. She researches contemporary American literature, literary and cultural theory, critical disaster and terrorism studies, and the digital humanities. Her dissertation, “Insurgents on the Bayou: Hurricane Katrina, Counterterrorism, and Literary Dissent on America’s Gulf Coast,” explores forms of political resistance put forward in literature and film produced after the flooding of New Orleans in 2005. Her research can be found in two forthcoming edited volumes, Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples (Vernon Press 2020) and Liberal Disorder: Emergency Politics, Populist Uprisings, and Digital Dictatorships (Routledge 2020).