Who Are We

Our Team

Elspeth Brown

Elspeth Brown

Director

Dr. Elspeth H. Brown is Professor of History at the University of Toronto, where she teaches queer and trans history; the history of US capitalism; oral history; and the history and theory of photography. Her digital humanities research has focused on queer and trans archives and oral history. She received her PhD from Yale University in 2000 and is the author of (most recently) WORK! A Queer History of Modeling (Duke University Press, 2019) and co-editor of Feeling Photography (2014, Duke University Press with Thy Phu). She is the principal investigator for the LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory, a team-based project and virtual working space where members come together to share work, ideas, and new knowledge about the creation of LGBTQ oral histories in the digital age. She is an active volunteer and former Co-President of the Board at The ArQuives, Canada’s Lesbian and Gay Archives, the world’s largest LGBTQ+ community archive.

You can learn more about her work at https://www.elspethbrown.org and sometimes find her on Twitter at @ElspethHBrown. For email please use: dhn.director@utoronto.ca.

Danielle Taschereau Mamers

Danielle Taschereau Mamers

Managing Director

Danielle Taschereau Mamers is the Managing Director of the CDHI. Danielle received her PhD in Media Studies from the University of Western Ontario in 2017. She has previously held postdoctoral fellowships at McMaster University (ECS), the University of Pennsylvania (WHC), and the University of Toronto (JHI). Danielle’s research identifies critical and creative strategies for destabilizing authority structures reproduced by documents, images, and their archives. Her first book, Settler Colonial Ways of Seeing (Fordham UP, forthcoming), investigates Indigenous artists’ engagements with settler documentation of Indian status in Canada. Her other projects include a study of art as a method of political theorizing and an archival and field-based analysis of the decolonial potential of bison reintroduction. Bridging critical digital humanities, environmental humanities, and public scholarship, Danielle co-created the Field Guide to Lost Futures with student researchers at McMaster University.

You can learn more about her work at www.dtmwrites.com and sometimes find her on Twitter at @DTMwrites. For email please use: d.taschereau@utoronto.ca.

Elizabeth Parke

Elizabeth Parke

Senior Research Associate

Dr. Elizabeth Parke is the Senior Research Associate for Collaborative Digital Research at the University of Toronto, Mississauga, where she coordinates the Collaborative Digital Research Space (CDRS) and works with humanities and social science researchers to build research strength in these areas. Her work with the DHN/CDHI is supported through the UTM’s VP Research Office. Elizabeth is a specialist in contemporary Chinese art and visual culture and previously held postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Toronto (JHI/CLIR) and Media@McGill. In her current book-length project: Sino-Automobilities she is examining how luxury car culture in the Sinophone world (Hong Kong, Singapore, Canada) functions as media, projecting information, protocols, and ways of communicating between drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Her DH projects include exploring Augmented Reality for restaging early Chinese performance works from the 1990s using GIS locational data, archival photographs, and online exhibition software. Elizabeth is the lead for faculty consultations on collaborative programming and part of our core team.

You can reach Elizabeth at elizabeth.parke@utoronto.ca.

Elisa Tersigni

Elisa Tersigni

JHI Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow, 2021-2022

Elisa Tersigni (Ph.D. University of Toronto, 2018) completed her doctorate in English and the collaborative program in Book History and Print Culture. After graduation, she held the position of Digital Research Fellow for the Mellon-funded research project, Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures at the Folger Shakespeare Library and a Digital Research Fellowship at the John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester. She has extensive experience working in both digital humanities projects and with special collections, having completed an M.Sc. in Material Cultures and History of the Book at the University of Edinburgh, and has received grants to pursue research at dozens of libraries across Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Her interests in digital humanities research extend across GIS mapping, textual analysis, transcription, and cataloguing of early manuscripts, and she is currently developing a new authorship attribution method that combines text analysis with GIS.

You can reach Elisa at dhn.admin@utoronto.ca.

Tanya Rohrmoser

Tanya Rohrmoser

Communications Officer

Tanya Rohrmoser is a writer and the Communications Officer for CDHI. She received her M.A. in English Literature from Brock University in 2010 and is a graduate of the Professional Writing & Communications program at Humber College. She has done consulting for local businesses, and worked in communications roles for House & Home Media, TIFF, University of Toronto Press, and Ridley College.

You can learn more about Tanya’s work at www.tanyarohrmoser.com and find her on Twitter at @TanyaRohrmoser. Reach her via email at XXXXXX@utoronto.ca.

Iris Chae

Iris Chae

Communications Assistant

Iris is an undergraduate student at the University of Toronto, currently in her second-year double majoring in CCIT and Art and Art History. Her educational pursuits include media communication, interactive design, and marketing. As an aspiring designer, she wishes to create a user-friendly environment and provide a meaningful experience through her designs.

Having social media marketing and graphic design experience from student associations such as UTKSA(University of Toronto Korean Student Association) and KOVA(Korean Outreach Volunteer Association), she aims to produce effective digital and print campaigns for DHN/CDHI. With this position, Iris hopes to connect deeper with the community through creative and meaningful digital content. As a Communication Assistant for the DHN/CDHI, she is in charge of producing social media content for digital marketing and events advertisements.

You can reach Iris at iris.chae@mail.utoronto.ca.

Jennifer Ross

Jennifer Ross

Conference Coordinator

Dr. Jennifer Ross works as the part-time conference coordinator for the 2021 DHN/CDHI annual conference as well as serves as the postdoctoral fellow for the Failure: Learning in Progress (FLiP) project. In 2020-2021, she was awarded the JHI/CLIR Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship.  Jennifer researches contemporary American literature, literary and cultural theory, critical disaster and terrorism studies, and the digital humanities.dissertation, “Insurgents on the Bayou: Hurricane Katrina, Counterterrorism, and Literary Dissent on America’s Gulf Coast,” explores forms of political resistance put forward in literature and film produced after the flooding of New Orleans in 2005. Her research can be found in the volumes Liberal Disorder: Emergency Politics, Populist Uprisings, and Digital Dictatorships (Routledge 2020) and Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples (Vernon Press 2021), as well as online at narrativeresistance.org.

You can reach Jennifer at jennifer.ross@utoronto.ca or dhn.admin@utoronto.ca.

Arun Jacob

Arun Jacob

Community Liaison

Arun Jacob is a doctoral student at the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto. His educational pursuits have included electronics engineering technology, professional communication, and labour studies. His research examines the media histories of educational technologies. Arun is the author of “Punching Holes in the International Busa Machine Narrative,” found in the volume Alternative Histories of the Digital Humanities (Punctum Books, 2021) co-edited by Dorothy Kim and Adeline Koh. He also co-authored the article “Transforming DH Pedagogy” (Digital Studies/le Champ Numérique 2020) with Nadine Boulay, Ashley Caranto Morford, Kush Patel, and Kimberly O’Donnell.  As program assistant for the DHN/CDHI, Arun is creating a new series of skills-based workshops for the upcoming academic year.

You can reach Arun at arun.jacob@mail.utoronto.ca. or dhn.admin@utoronto.ca.

Researchers

Laurie Bertram

Laurie Bertram

Assistant Professor

Type of research:
North America, material culture, research project, website, mapping, history, archives

Research projects:
Object Lives and Global Histories in Northern North America + “Sex Work and the Queen City: Mapping Toronto’s Sex Trade History

Kristen Bos

Kristen Bos

Assistant Professor of Indigenous Science and Technology Studies

Research projects:
Technoscience Research Unit

Elspeth H. Brown

Elspeth H. Brown

Professor of History

Type of research:
LGBQT2+; digital archives; community archives; video; podcasts

Research projects:
LGBQT Oral History Digital Collaboratory

Mark Campbell

Mark Campbell

Assistant Professor of Musicology, Music Technology & Digital Media

Beth Coleman

Beth Coleman

Associate Professor of Data & Cities

T.L. Cowan

T.L. Cowan

Assistant Professor of Media Studies

Type of research:
ethics, collaboratory, LGBQT, digital archive

Research projects:
Cabaret Commons + Digital Research Ethics Collaboratory (DREC)

Anver Emon

Anver Emon

Professor of Law and History

Type of research:
racism, Canada, contemporary, law

Research projects:
Under Layered Suspicion

Alex Gillespie

Alex Gillespie

Vice-President & Principal UTM

Type of research:
history of the book, Micro CT, eZooMS, codex, Arabic, Turkish, medieval, manuscript, bindings, digitization, Omeka, pedagogy, palaeography, codicology, Mirador, IIIF, Viscoli, Middle Ages, literature, Europe, VisCodex, English

Research projects:
The Book and the Silk Roads + Digital Tools for Manuscript Study

James Ginther

James Ginther

Timothy Harrison

Timothy Harrison

Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology

Type of research:
archeology, Near East, OCHRE, Turkey, Syria, data mining, visualization, database, simulation, mapping, 3D modeling, petography

Research projects:
Computational Research on the Ancient Near East (CRANE)

Pamela Klassen

Pamela Klassen

Professor, Department of Religion

Type of research: digital storytelling, Indigenous, Iroquois, community, settler-colonialism, 17th century, 19th century, 20th century, contemporary, Canada

Research projects:
Kiinawin Kawindomowin Story Nations

Alejandro Paz

Alejandro Paz

Professor of Anthropology

Thy Phu

Thy Phu

Professor of Media Studies

Bhavani Raman

Bhavani Raman

Associate Professor of History

Ajay Rao

Ajay Rao

Associate Professor, Historical Studies; Director of Graduate Studies

Type of research:
database, manuscripts, South Asia, digital archive, repository, Sanskrit

Research projects:
Age of Vedanta Project with the Prosopographical Database of Indic Texts (PANDiT)

Jasmine Rault

Jasmine Rault

Assistant Professor of Media Studies

Type of research:
ethics, collaboratory, LGBQT, digital archive, interdisciplinarity, platforms, apps, digitality, new media

Research projects:
Cabaret CommonsDigital Research Ethics Collaboratory (DREC) + Critical Digital Methods Institute (CDMI)

Natalie Rothman

Natalie Rothman

Associate Professor of History, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies Chair

Type of research:
Ottoman Empire, Europe, 16th century, 17th century, History, Renaissance, collaboratory, Renaissance, History, Zotero, Middle East

Research projects:
Dragoman Renaissance Research Platform + Serai: Premodern Encounters

Timothy Sayle

Timothy Sayle

Assistant Professor of History and Director of the International Relations Program

Avery Slater

Avery Slater

Assistant Professor

Nick Terpstra

Nick Terpstra

Professor of History

Research projects:
Decima + Hidden Florence

Tamara Walker

Tamara Walker

Associate Professor of History

Type of research:
afrolatinx, digital archive, Latin America, Black, visual culture, database, repository, History

Research projects:
Color and Overtones: A Web-Based Visual Archive of Africans and their Descendants in Latin America

Jennifer Wemigwans

Jennifer Wemigwans

CDHI Project Assistants

We occasionally receive inquiries from University of Toronto-led teams looking to hire students for digital projects. These requests state different levels of humanities and programming expertise. If you would like to be referred for one of these positions when they open up, please email us your resume/CV, along with a brief statement of interest. For any current openings, visit the “Open Calls” section at the bottom of the page, where you can reach out directly to the hiring Principal Investigator (PI).

Currently we have no CDHI Project Assistants, as we are just establishing this initiative. Please come back and explore this page in Fall, 2021.

Digital Humanities Consultants

The CDHI will be hiring graduate students annually to join our team as consultants. Whether you use machine learning to find aesthetic patterns in 17th-century drawings or interactive data visualizations to track instances of textual reuse in Romantic literature we want to hear from you.

Specific responsibilities vary, but consultants should expect:

  • to meet with University of Toronto students, faculty, and staff to provide guidance on research questions in a 1-on-1 or group setting,
  • to answer common questions across various disciplines,
  • to draw on your expertise on specific digital humanities or data analysis topics, and to act as a point person for related questions,
  • to think on the fly, identify project needs, and help develop a recommendation for how researchers should proceed given their subject area, expertise, and timeline.

If you would like to be referred for one of these positions when they open up, please email us your resume/CV, along with a brief statement of interest.

Currently we have no CDHI Consultants, as we are just establishing this initiative. Please come back and explore this page in Fall, 2021.

Open Call for positions

Call for Funding: JHI Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship

The Jackman Humanities Institute (JHI) at the University of Toronto, in partnership with the Digital Humanities Network, offers a twelve-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Digital Humanities, with a project that fits the JHI’s annual theme, “Labour”. Apply by 30 November 2021.

Call for Applications – Postdoctoral Fellowship with the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative, University of Toronto (deadline: Feb 19)

The Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI), in concert with the University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies Provost Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, is pleased to invite applications for a two year, fixed term postdoctoral fellowship beginning no later than December 31, 2021. The successful applicant will be supervised by CDHI Director Elspeth Brown. Applicants should propose research related to digital humanities from a critical, intersectional perspective.    The CDHI...

CDHI Research Fellowships

The CHDI will be awarding research fellowships for both University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate research fellowships, as well as postdoctoral fellowships for which external candidates are encouraged to apply, through 2024. We will be awarding these fellowships through a widely circulated call for applications and through a transparent adjudication process. When the fellows are selected, we will place bios and photos here. For more information about these opportunities, see Funding Opportunities.

CDHI Teaching Fellows

The CHDI will be awarding research fellowships for both University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate research fellowships, as well as postdoctoral fellowships for which external candidates are encouraged to apply, through 2024. We will be awarding these fellowships through a widely circulated call for applications and through a transparent adjudication process. When the fellows are selected, we will place bios and photos here. For more information about these opportunities, see Funding Opportunities.